Sunday, December 11, 2016

Carpe Diem #1093 Concertino pour harpe et piano by Germaine Tailleferre


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Another nice episode to inspire you. I found a really nice piece of music by a not so wellknown female composer Germaine Tailleferre.

Germaine Tailleferre (1892-1983)

Germaine Tailleferre (1892 – 1983) was a French composer and the only female member of the group of composers known as Les Six.

She was born Marcelle Taillefesse at Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, Val-de-Marne, France, but as a young woman she changed her last name to "Tailleferre" to spite her father, who had refused to support her musical studies. She studied piano with her mother at home, composing short works of her own, after which she began studying at the Paris Conservatory where she met Louis Durey, Francis Poulenc, Darius Milhaud, Georges Auric, and Arthur Honegger. At the Paris Conservatory her skills were rewarded with prizes in several categories. Most notably Tailleferre wrote 18 short works in the Petit livre de harpe de Madame Tardieu for Caroline Tardieu, the Conservatory’s Assistant Professor of Harp.

With her new friends, she soon was associating with the artistic crowd in the Paris districts of Montmartre and Montparnasse, including the sculptor Emmanuel Centore who later married her sister Jeanne. It was in the Montparnasse atelier of one of her painter friends where the initial idea for Les Six began. The publication of Jean Cocteau's manifesto Le coq et l'Arlequin resulted in Henri Collet's media articles that led to instant fame for the group, of which Tailleferre was the only female member.

In 1923, Tailleferre began to spend a great deal of time with Maurice Ravel at his home in Monfort-L'Amaury. Ravel encouraged her to enter the Prix de Rome Competition. In 1925, she married Ralph Barton, an American caricaturist, and moved to Manhattan, New York. She remained in the United States until 1927 when she and her husband returned to France. They divorced shortly thereafter.

Tailleferre wrote many of her most important works during the 1920s, including her 1st Piano Concerto, the Harp Concertino, the ballets Le marchand d'oiseaux (the most frequently performed ballet in the repertoire of the Ballets suédois during the 1920s), La nouvelle Cythère, which was commissioned by Sergei Diaghilev for the ill-fated 1929 season of the famous Ballets Russes, and Sous les ramparts d'Athènes in collaboration with Paul Claudel, as well as several pioneering film scores, including B'anda, in which she used African themes.

The 1930s were even more fruitful, with the Concerto for Two Pianos, Chorus, Saxophones, and Orchestra, the Violin Concerto, the opera cycle Du style galant au style méchant, the operas Zoulaïna and Le marin de Bolivar, and her masterwork, La cantate de Narcisse, in collaboration with Paul Valéry. Her work in film music included Le petit chose by Maurice Cloche and a series of documentaries. (source: wikipedia)




I hope I have inspired you with this composition. I however wasn't inspired enough and couldn't come up with a haiku or tanka. Maybe later and than I will share it with you of course.


This episode is open for your submissions tonight at 7.00 PM (CET) and will remain open until December 16th at noon (CET). I will try to publish our new episode, Trio for Violin, Cello and Piano Op. 17 Allegro Moderato by Clara Schumann, later on.


3 comments:

  1. I am unable to like or comment on any of GoldenBear's posts, so I would like to say that Rainy Streets at Six PM evokes such a beautiful, melancholic image:
    'neon lights
    reflected on rainwashed streets
    happy christmas for some
    for others put your lapels up
    smile and keep walking alone'

    ReplyDelete
  2. I am with Kim about Hamish's recent posts.

    ReplyDelete
  3. And Kristjaan, thank you ever so much for all the time you spend creating these wonderful prompts.

    ReplyDelete

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