Saturday, November 30, 2013

Carpe Diem #337, Kanpai!



Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Welcome at our first episode of Carpe Diem's new month of daily haiku writing. This month all the prompts are (as we did earlier this year with the music of Karunesh) music-pieces for your inspiration. Let me tell you first why I have chosen the Celtic Crosses in the Snow for our December Carpe Diem logo.
First this month in the Northern part of the world it will become winter, the snow. And second ... the music for this month is mostly based on Celtic Culture. Our featured musician, a young promising one, Adrian von Ziegler is a Swiss musician born on the 25th December 1989. He composes various styles of mostly gothic and celtic music His group of fans is called "The Pack'' as in wolf pack and I am proud to be part of his pack. He composed a wonderful piece of music especially for his fans and that composition will be coming along also this month.

I 'ran into' his music as I was searching for new musical videos for Carpe Diem. I hadn''t heard of him, but I was immediately a fan of his music so I asked him permission to use his music and he, thank God, gave me that permission on September 12th. So I had time to prepare the promptlist and discover his music during the months before December.


Adrian von Ziegler, our featured musician this month

Adrian has composed (in my opinion) wonderful music ... and I think you all will like it as much as I do. So ... let us start with our first music-piece composed by him for this month. To start this new month of Carpe Diem I have chosen his 'world-music'- piece Kanpai!. He was inspired by all the Japanese Festivals and composed this piece of music with that in his mind.
The video shows us Japanese Festival Lanterns. Here it is:




What do you think of this music? I liked it a lot, but ... well I am a big fan of his music of course (smiles). It inspired me to write the next haiku.

Taiko drummers
in the midst of the night
chasing ghosts

chasing ghosts
with their strong drumming sound
Taiko drummers


Well ... I hope you all liked this episode ... our new Carpe Diem month has started with a drum-roll and I hope to read wonderful haiku inspired on the music-videos by Adrian von Ziegler. Have fun, be inspired and share your haiku, inspired on the music, with us all here at Carpe Diem Haiku Kai.
This episode will stay on until December 2th 11.59 AM (CET) and I will post our new episode, Qi (or Chi), later on today around 7.00 PM (CET). !! This first episode of Carpe Diem December is open for your submissions at 7.00 PM (CET) today (11/30) !!



Friday, November 29, 2013

Carpe Diem's Tan Renga Challenge Month #XXX, Flatfroghaiku's "harbour moon'



Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Today our Tan Renga Challenge is coming to an end. It was really a joy to prepare every episode of this Tan Renga Month for you all my dear friends. I am so happy that you all were so much involved with this Carpe Diem Month, not the least by all of your wonderful haiku which I might use for the Tan Renga Challenges this month. I hope that you all did like this month and maybe ... next November I will do this another time ... we will see.

http://thesubclubbooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/thank-you-card.jpg


I am looking forward to our next month's challenge to write haiku inspired by the wonderful (mostly) Celtic music composed by Adrian von Ziegler, a promising young musician. And I hope it will be a joy for you all to write haiku again (smiles).

Back to our last Tan Renga Challenge of this month. Today's Tan Renga is started by Joe of Flat Frog Haiku. He wrote this haiku in response of our Kamishibai episode 'lighthouse' and I think this is a really beautifully composed haiku to start a Tan Renga with. So here it is:

harbour moon
the loneliness of fishermen
under lighthouse cliff

(c) Joe of Flat Frog Haiku


http://www.hdwallpapersinn.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/lighthouse-reworked-7499450.jpg

And here is my attempt to complete this wonderful Tan Renga started by Joe's haiku:

harbour moon
the loneliness of fishermen
under lighthouse cliff 
                                         (Joe of Flat Frog Haiku)

in their pub along the harbour
they become drunk to forget 
                               (Chèvrefeuille)

I think this is a nice completed Tan Renga in which I have tried to tell a short story about loneliness and forgetting. And with this Tan Renga completed by your host ... our Tan Renga Challenge Month is over. I hope you all did enjoy this month and I hope to see you here again next month in which we will be using music for our inspiration.

This episode of our Tan Renga Challenge Month will be on until December 2nd 11.59 AM (CET) and is open for your submissions today at 7.00 PM (CET). Have fun be inspired and share your completed Tan Renga with us all here at Carpe Diem Haiku Kai. I will publish our first musical prompt of December 'kanpai!' Later on today (30/11) around 7.00 PM (CET)


Carpe Diem's Revise that Haiku #3, Buson's "a hand-ball"

 

Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Another episode of Carpe Diem's "Revise that Haiku'. Another challenge to look at a different way to a haiku of the classical haiku-poets. This time I have choosen a haiku written by Yosa Buson (1716-1783), one the great four haiku-poets next to Basho, Issa and Shiki.
Buson was, next to being a poet also a painter of Haiga. In his haiku he paints with words sometimes even better. He illustrated once Basho's "Oku no Hosomichi" in the late 18th century.
The haiku to revise is the following:

a hand-ball,
wet with the spring rain falling
on the roof

(c) Buson

Credits: Bonobo with Orange Ball

And this is the scene which inspired Buson to write this haiku:

[...] All day the rain has continued. It seems that it has never begun and will never stop. The poet goes to the verandah and stands looking out at the melancholy scene. Caught in the gutter of the roof opposite is a ball made of cloth that children were playing with and that lodged there by accident. The rain pours down relentlessly upon it as upon everything else, soaking its pretty design and colours. The rain continues meaninglessly, uselessly to beat down on the ball. The ball continues meaninglessly, uselessly to be beaten on by the rain. The poet suddenly sees, almost without knowing it, a 'meaningless' meaning in this ball, in this rain, in all things. The ball grows sodden, and still the rain falls upon it, as though it were a thing that the rain could make blossom.[...]
This is the poetical life of the verse, the sheer lack of relation between the rain and the ball and the roof, - other than that of proximity.



And now ... I have to try to revise that haiku ... not an easy task I think. This haiku by Buson gives me not so much to work with, but the scene gives me something to work with. And I came up with the following haiku:

spring rains falling
suddenly the cherry trees bloom -
the sound of a windchime

in the gutter
after the pouring rain of spring
plum blossom petals

Hm .. not an easy one to revise, a real challenge this is ... let me re-think this verse again and try another revision.

all day spring rain falls
soaking the dried out grounds -
field flowers blossom

Another attempt:

a ball left alone
in the muddy puddles -
fading colors



Well ... it's fun to look at an ancient haiku and try to revise that haiku. It's a way to learn to write haiku. So ... try it yourself.

This episode of Carpe Diem "Revise That Haiku" will stay on until Christmas Eve 11.59 AM (CET) and is NOW OPEN for your submissions. Have fun, be inspired and share your revised haiku with us all here at Carpe Diem Haiku Kai.


Carpe Diem "Make the Haiku Complete" #4, "rising up to heaven?"


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

It's my pleasure to share with you all a new episode of Carpe Diem Make the haiku complete. This new episode will be a bit different than the other episodes of this feature. In those episodes we had to complete the haiku by writing the last line, but in this episode ... I love to challenge you all to complete the haiku by writing the first line of it.
It's a wellknown haiku by one of the classical haiku-masters and the only thing I will give you here is the scene on which the haiku was inspired.

[...] The moon is hazy, and the faint sweet scent of the plum blossoms rises up towards it. The halo of the moon is to the eye what the scent of the blossoms is to the sense of smell; the whiteness of the flowers and that of the halo reflect each other, and are one in that faint sweet perfume [...]

 


And here it is ... the haiku to complete by writing the first line.
 
.................................................
is it not the scent of plum-blossoms
rising up to heaven?


Of course this isn't  easy, but it's worth a try and so here is my attempt to complete this haiku.

mysterious full moon,
is it not the scent of plum-blossoms
rising up to heaven?

(c) Chèvrefeuille

Hm ... not that strong I think, but I think it was worth the effort to try and share it with you all here at our haiku-community.

This episode of Carpe Diem Make The Haiku Complete will stay on until December 24th 11.59 AM (CET) and is NOW OPEN for your submissions.


Thursday, November 28, 2013

Carpe Diem's Tan Renga Challenge Month #XXIX Moondustwriter's ''I Hear You Speak''



Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

This is the before last episode of this month of Tan Renga ... it was a joy (and a struggle) to prepare these episodes for you all. I am so glad that you all did like this Tan Renga Challenge Month, maybe I will do this another time again ...
It's a joy to tell you all that our new prompt-list is ready and published. You can find it HERE.

Our Tan Renga today is started by Leslie Moon of Moondustwriter''s blog and she composed this haiku in response on ''shell''.

I hear you speak
waves tumble half a world away
conch’s song

(c) Leslie Moon


Well ... have fun. During lack of time I will not give my attempt here.

This episode of our Tan Renga Challenge Month is NOW OPEN for your submissions and will stay open until December 1st 11.59 AM (CET).



Carpe Diem Goes Back to It's Roots #3 ''waka''



Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

An all new episode of our feature ''Carpe Diem Goes Back to It's Roots'' in which I love to tell you more about the classical origins of haiku. In this episode I will look at Waka, an ancient Chinese/Japaese poem from which Tanka originated and several years later haiku.
Before we deal with the relation of waka and haiku, we have to look at the relation between waka and Chinese poetry. The Manyoshu consists of more than four thousand pieces, the great majority being waka, and the rest naga-uta, or long poems. Two or three hundred years before, Wani, a Korean poet, had brought the Analects and the Senjimon, (A thousand characters, written about 525 AD) to Japan, and the influence of  Chinese thought and literature had begun. The Kokinshu, completed about 922, contains only five naga-uta, an this may well have been partly due to the influence of Chinese poetry, which, however long the poems may be, is meaty to the eye as well as to the mind, where as a long Japanese poem tends to be flimsy and vague.
In classic Japan the language in which poems and literature were written was Chinese, so most known waka were also in Chinese.

Chinese Poetry (Jueju)

Chinese poetry and waka have been sung or intoned by the people of the palace and the nobility in general as we already know (lecture 2) also Renga was something of the palace and nobility.
The Roeishu, or Collection of Clear Songs, Japanese and Chinese, commonly accepted publishing dat in the 10th or 11th century. The Roeishu consists of two parts. The first divided into seasons and subdivided into subjects, the second divided into subjects irrespective of seasons. For each subject, part of a Chinese poem, usually that of Hakurakuten, a part of a Chinese verse, by a Japanese writer, and waka are given, the number of each varying.
For example: in the first part, under Winter Evening, we have two lines from a poem by Hakurakuten:

''One cold lamp at night among the clouds;
many cups of warm wine is spring in the snow"


Several old cronies are gathered together in a house high up in the mountains, and the cup passes round, gladdening their hearts as though spring had come.
The next is two lines of a Chinese poem,  Sitting up Alone at Night in Winter: 

"The years passing with the guttering of the lamp,
the traveller's grief only grows at his pillow"


This verse describes the increasing loneliness of the traveller; as the night draws on the lamp goes out at his bedside. It is by a Japanese poet, Aritsura, who afterwards became a monk, and took the name Sonkyo. Last, there is a waka by Ki no Tsurayuki (883-946), author of the Tosanikki, a classic of travel diaries, and one of the compilers of the Kokinshu (+/- 922). He is one of the greatest masters of waka.

filled with longing
I go to her I love;
the river wind is chill tonight,
plovers crying


(c) Ki no Tsurayuki (Tr. R.H. Blyth)

These three poems show how waka and Chinese verse were compared and contrasted by the Japanese poets. One more point to say, Buddhism influenced the waka, even more then Chinese poetry did.


http://history.cultural-china.com/en/61History7833.html


In dealing with the realtion between waka and haiku we may begin by describing Basho's attitude and then give a more general account of the differences between the two.
Basho, the spiritual founder of modern haiku, lived during the second half of the 17th century. In the first half of the century, the Teitoku-school (1570-1633) was flourishing. A typical example of this work is the following:

hana yorimo  dango ya arite  kaeru kari

dumplings
being better than flowers,
the geese are returning there?

(c) Teitoku (Tr. R.H. Blyth)

Teitoku has taken two elements and combined them, first the popular saying Hana yori dango, meaning, something to eat is better than something to look at, the material than the spiritual. The other is a poem from the Kokinshu:

haru-gasumi  tatsu we misutete  yuku kari wa
hana naka sato ni  sumi ya naraeru


they see the spring mist rising,
but the wild geese depart,
wont to dwell
in flowless villages?

(Tr. R.H. Blyth)



Teitoku has taken a quite beautiful old verse, abbreviated it, and inserted in it a popular but not very elevated proverb.
Towards the middle of the 17th century, the Danrin-school under Soin arose. This also made puns, combinations of scraps of learning, and wit, its chief objects. For example:

atai araba  nanika oshima no  aki no kei

should it have such worth,
what would I not give
for the scenery of Autmn?

(c) Soin (Tr. R.H.Blyth)

Soin composed the verse in praise of the Island of Ojima at Matsushima.
A little later, that is, in the second half of the 17th century, there were great movements in haikai circles; Basho and Onitsura appeared. The reasons for this phenomenon may be adduced in the social and spiritual conditions of the age, but the fact that such matters are as inscrutable as the mystery of life itself. In any case, there was a general desire to raise haiku from its low state of punning and joking, to the high literary and spiritual level of waka.
Basho wished to make haiku something that waka was not, an expression of popular feeling, in the sense that it should express the intensity of daily life. The aim of Basho was to continue what began with the Teitoku-school and increased with the Danrin-school, the employment of popular phraseology, Chinese expressions and other foreign words. Haiku poets wanted somehow or other, by the use of, haiku words, to make haiku something different from a short waka. Here was the spirit which, in the case of Basho, was more important than the form in which it was to be expressed. Basho was more interested in the spirit of Chinese poetry than its form, but an example of his imitation of one of the 'tricks' of Chinese poetry, is seen in the following:

hige kaze wo fuite  boshu tanzuru wa  tare ga ko zo

who is it that grieves,
the wind blowing through his beard,
for late autumn?

(Tr. R.H.Blyth)


https://kirstinhanssen.wordpress.com/2010/08/04/haiku/


In haiku, the gentlest, most melancholy and quiet aspects of things are grasped with an energy, a concentration, an elan, which seventeen syllables and no more are fitted to express. Basho occasionally tried to do in haiku what could be better done in waka. The lyrical vague, the cloudy emotional, the dreamy forlorn, - this is the realm of waka, and length is necessary for it.

hito sumana  fuwa no sekiya no  itabisashi 
arenishi nochi wa  tada aki no kaze


no one lives at the Barrier of Fuha;
the wooden penthouse is fallen away;
all that remains
is the autumn wind

Upon this, from the Shin Kokinshu, Basho composed the following:

aki-kaze ya  yabu mo hataka mo  fuwa no seki

the autumn wind;
thickets and fields also,
Fuha Barrier

(Tr. R.H.Blyth)

This is much inferior to the waka. It omits the most poetical part, the thought in the last two lines, and requires the waka as a postscript, to enable the haiku to be understood at all
Coming now to the general differences between waka and haiku, we may say that waka aim at beauty, a somewhat superficial beauty sometimes, that excludes all ugly things. The aim of haiku is not beauty; it is something much deeper and wider. It is significance, a peotical significance, 'a shock of mild surprise', that the poet receives when the haiku is born, and the reader when it is reborn in his mind.
Haiku seizes a moment of inexplicable depth. It does not look before and after, but confines itself to the timeless, when life suddenly deepens, and all the universe is present.

For example a haiku by Buson (1716-1783):

lightning one candle
with another candle;
an evening of spring

(Tr. R.H. Blyth)


http://st3.flashrolls.net/wallpaper/069/fd91ed7cc53748beb18e7f2864a8d99c.jpg


Haiku are self-deliterating; they are the real 'songs without words'. In haiku the melody and rhythm remove the barriers of custom and prejudice between ourselves and the object. When we say 'object', this doesn't mean that it is necessarily a material thing. It may be time, the length of a spring day or shortness of a summer night. But even this is felt in a material way; spring is a manifold of sensations, and the passage of time is as palpable as the flowing of a stream.
From the haiku point of view, waka say to much.
Compare the following waka, by Hitomaro, with the haiku by Basho. First the waka:

evening mist is trailing
over Mount Kagu
in the ageless sky;
it must be
that spring is here

And now the haiku by Basho:

spring has come;
a nameless hill
is shrouded in thin mist

(Tr. R.H.Blyth)

Here the historical association is not merely avoided, the point of the haiku lies in the very avoidance. The aim of haiku is to live twenty four hours a day, that is, to put meaning into every moment, a meaning that may be intense or diffuse, but never ceases.
OK ... enough information I think (smiles). Let me go on with the goal of this new episode of "Back to Our Roots".
 


The goal of this episode of Carpe Diem's Goes Back to It's Roots is to choose a waka, you can find a lot of them on the Internet, and re-do that waka into a haiku. The haiku has to follow the classical rules as there are:
  1. 5-7-5 syllables
  2. a moment as short as the sound of a pebble thrown into water
  3. a keriji or cuttingword
  4. a kigo or seasonword
  5. the poet him/herself is not present in the haiku
  6. and objectivity as we have learned today.
I have chosen a waka written by Gotokudaji Sadajin:

hototgisu  nakitsuru kata o  naga mureba  tada ariake no  tsuki zo nokoreru

looking
where the hototogisu
had cried,
only remaining
the moon of dawn

I 're-vised,  have re-done' this waka into:

the cry of a young cuckoo
lingers in the midsummer night -
the early light - a new day

(c) Chèvrefeuille

This episode of Carpe Diem Goes Back to It's Roots will stay on until December 24 th 11.59 AM (CET) and is now open for your submissions. Have fun, be inspired and share your haiku with us all here at Carpe Diem Haiku Kai.


Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Carpe Diem's Tan renga Challenge Month #XXVIII, Imaginator's ''with light in your eyes''


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

We are counting of ... still three days to go with this Tan Renga Challenge Month and today I have a nice haiku written by The Imaginator of Blog of the Imaginator is sharing his haiku in response on ''embrace'' as the starting verse for our next Tan Renga Challenge. It''s (in my opinion) a beautiful haiku/senryu and I think it can inspire you all to write a nice continuation.


With light in your eyes
You embrace me in your arms
Our hearts beat as one

(c) The Imaginator

Embrace

What a wonderful photo of embracing people, two guys, two races ... awesome ...

My attempt to complete this Tan Renga:

With light in your eyes
You embrace me in your arms
Our hearts beat as one
                                               (The Imaginator)

no more boundaries to solve
finally they may love each other
                                    (Chèvrefeuille)

A nice continuation of the romance in the first stanza ... makes the painted scene more intense and natural. Love has to be unconditional ...

This episode will stay on until November 30th 11.59 AM (CET) and is open for your submissions later today at 7.00 PM (CET). Have fun, be inspired and share your continuation of this Tan Renga started by The Imaginator.



Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Carpe Diem's Tan Renga Challenge Month #XXVII, Kaykuala's ''rustling leaves dancing''


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

What a joy to present to you a new episode of our Tan Renga Challenge Month. Today I love to share a haiku by Kaykuala of Rainbow. Kaykuala wrote this haiku in response on our CD Extra episode 3 in which I introduced to you all this Tan Renga Challenge Month.
As I read this response I was very happy ... it's a marvelous haiku to start our Tan Renga with, here it is:


Rustling leaves dancing
Light breeze brushing rosy cheeks
Young hearts aflutter

(c) Kaykuala


I hope to read wonderful continuations on this starting verse by Kaykuala ... No attempt of me this time, because of lack of time.

This episode will stay on until November 29th 11.59 AM (CET) and is NOW OPEN for your submissions.
Have fun!





Monday, November 25, 2013

Carpe Diem's Tan Renga Challenge Month #XXVI, Opie Houston's ''O sweet October''


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Today a new challenge for this Tan Renga Month. Today I love to share another haiku as starting verse for our Tan Renga inspired on Frost's October (Carpe Diem's Distillation). Today our Tan Renga is started by Opie Houston and is called ''O, Sweet October''. Opie shares his/her haiku on Facebook and he/she writes a lot ...

This is the haiku for starting the Tan Renga:


oh, sweet october...
spare thy frost on yonder grapes
our sweet summer wine

(c) Opie Houston

October Grapes

What a nice haiku to start this Tan Renga with ... and the above photo is going so well along with it ... I am not a drinker of wine, but I can appreciate sometimes a good wine ...

Here is my attempt to complete this Tan Renga:

oh, sweet october...
spare thy frost on yonder grapes
our sweet summer wine
                                        (Opie Houston)

on the verandah with friends
playing cards and drinking wine
                             (Chèvrefeuille)

Playing Cards

And now it's up to you my dear friends. This episode of Carpe Diem's Tan Renga Challenge Month is open for your submissions today at 7.00 PM (CET) and will stay on until November 28th 11.59 AM (CET). Have fun, be inspired and share.



Sunday, November 24, 2013

Carpe Diem's Tan renga Challenge Month #XXV, Gene's "October Forest''


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Time flies when you have fun ... it's a phrase we use often here in The Netherlands, but it's very true. We are almost at the end of this Tan Renga Challenge Month and it was fun ... don't you think so? It was a different month, but a joy to make.
Today our 25th Tan Renga Challenge of this month ... I have chosen a wonderful haiku to start the Tan Renga with. This haiku was inspired on the poem ''October'' by Frost, which we had for our 4th Carpe Diem ''distillation'' episode and it's written by Gene of Gene's Musings.Today's Tan Renga starts with:


October forest
With amethyst enchantment
Frost greeting sunlight

(c) Gene

Not an easy one to complete I think, but I am looking forward to your completion of this Tan Renga.

October Forest

All those wonderful colors of autumn ... at their most beautiful time in October. Really this looks like a festival of colors, celebrating Mother Nature ... Awesome.

Here is my attempt to complete this Tan Renga:

October forest
with amethyst enchantment
frost greeting sunlight
                                                 (Gene)

the silence of an auutmn morning
rejoicing Mother Nature's love
                                  (Chèvrefeuille)

Ah! Autumn ... Autumn ... my season.

Now it's up to you my dear Haijin, visitors and travelers to complete this Tan Renga in your own way. Have fun, be inspired and share your completed Tan Renga with us all here at Carpe Diem Haiku Kai.
This episode of our Tan Renga Challenge Month will stay on until November 27th 11.59 AM (CET) and is open for your submissions today at 7.00 PM (CET).



Saturday, November 23, 2013

Carpe Diem's Tan Renga Challenge Month #XXIV, Sun's ''gathering seashells''


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

What a lovely day it is here, a nice sunny day, not to cold (around 7 degrees Celsius), no wind ... really it feels like a soft winter's day. Our Tan Renga Challenge for today however has nothing to do with the weather or winter. It's a nice haiku written by Sun of Simply Charming and it was her response on ''shell'' one of our prompts in our first anniversary month.
Today one of her haiku is the starting verse of our Tan Renga ... here it is:

gathering seashells
while ocean tide rise and falls
two sisters bicker

(c) Sun

Conch shells

Awesome photograph of Conch Shells on a beach of the Bahama's. This kind of shells we don't find here on the beaches of The Netherlands ... I wish they could be found here ....

My attempt to complete this Tan Renga started by Sun:

gathering seashells
while ocean tide rise and falls
two sisters bicker
                                                          (Sun)

the soothing sound of the waves
day dreaming of the Bahama's  
                                      (Chèvrefeuille)

I hope to visit the Bahama's once, but until than I only can dream about those islands. Nice dream isn't it? 
Now it's up to you my dear Haijin, visitors and travelers to complete this Tan Renga in your own unique way. Have fun, be inspired and share your completed Tan Renga with us. (By the way: I am still behind with commenting, hope to catch up soon).
This episode of Carpe Diem's Tan Renga Challenge Month will stay on 'til November 26th 11.59 AM (CET) and is open for your submissions today at 7.00 PM (CET).



Friday, November 22, 2013

Carpe Diem's Tan Renga Challenge Month #XIII, Off The Tippet's ''echoes of the past''


Good day dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

It seems that some of you are a bit anxious to participate in this Tan Renga Challenge Month, because I haven't seen a few contributors to our daily haiku meme. Of course they can have several reasons to not participate in this Tan Renga Month, or they are of for a while. But ... you are free to participate and enjoy the challenge, but no obligations, just feel free to participate and share.
As for today's Tan Renga Challenge ... the starting verse is written by Off The Tippet (his/her weblog has the same name) in response on our prompt ''shell'' last month. ''Shell'' was provided by Lolly and I have read wonderful haiku than in response to it. So our starting verse is inspired on ''shell'' and here it is:


echoes of the past
resound into the present
a dream of the sea

(c) Off The Tippet

Shell on the Beach
I think this haiku, our first stanza of our new Tan Renga, is gorgeous and has a nice deeper layer. Such a deeper layer I can surely appreciate. 

Here is my attempt to complete this Tan Renga with a second stanza:

echoes of the past
resound into the present
a dream of the sea
                                              (Off The Tippet)

the sound of breakers
puts me in ecstasy
                                               (Chèvrefeuille)

Ah! That roaring surf ... a soothing sound to lighten the spirit and my mind. I love that especially when storms are raging ... really a wonderful experience ... leaning against the wind ... wow ....
Well ... now it's up to you my dear Haijin, visitors and travelers to complete this Tan Renga started by Off The Tippet in your own way ... Have fun, be inspired and feel free to share your inspired second stanza and the completed Tan Renga with our haiku family here at Carpe Diem Haiku Kai.

This episode of our Tan Renga Challenge Month will stay on until November 25th 11.59 AM (CET) and is open for your submissions today at 7.00 PM (CET). Have fun!


Thursday, November 21, 2013

Carpe Diem's Tan Renga Challenge Month # XXII, The Inner Zone's "sheets of waves cover''


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Today the haiku to start the Tan Renga with is written by ''the Inner zone'' of ''The pigments of life'' and is written in response of one of our Kamishibai episodes "lighthouse''. She/he wrote only a haiku, but it was really a nice haiku. And I think that you can write a wonderful second stanza towards this Tan Renga.
Here follows the first stanza of our new Tan Renga Challenge:

sheets of waves cover
asleep sea, lighthouse rotates
sparkling lullabies

(c) The Inner Zone

Roker Lighthouse

And here is my attempt to complete this Tan Renga:

sheets of waves cover
asleep sea, lighthouse rotates
sparkling lullabies
                                                  (The Inner Zone)

waves thunder and break
against the foot of the lighthouse
                             (Chèvrefeuille)

And now it's up to you my dear Haijin, visitors and travelers to complete this Tan Renga in your own unique way. This episode of our Tan Renga Challenge Month will stay on until November 24th 11.59 AM (CET) and is open for your submissions later on today around 7.00 PM (CET). So ... have fun, be inspired and share.


Wednesday, November 20, 2013

Carpe Diem's Tan Renga Challenge Month #XXI, Cathy Tenzo's "the Buddha Himself"



Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Another day in haiku paradise and especially in Tan Renga Paradise this month. Another wonderful haiku to start a Tan Renga Challenge with. Today it's a haiku in response on October's prompt "Buddha" and it's written by Cathy Tenzo of Haiku Plate Special. I think it's an awesome haiku in which the Buddha is be seen as also just a human who had to go his way and fins his own path to Enlightenment. Here it is:

the Buddha himself
did not start enlightened
he walked the path
(c) Cathy Tenzo




I am not a Buddhist, but as a haiku-poet I am a Buddhist, ... do you understand that? ....
Haiku is strongly connected with Buddhism and Zen-Buddhism and therefore I have to think sometimes as a Buddhist. In one of our upcoming episodes of "back to it's roots" I will tell you all more about the Buddhistic influences in haiku ... and of course in next January and February for sure as we are going on a Buddhistic Pilgrimage.
OK ... back to this episode of our Tan Renga Challenge Month. Here is my attempt to complete this Tan Renga started by Cathy:

the Buddha himself
did not start enlightened
he walked the path                                          (Cathy Tenzo)

following the signs along the path
the lotus comes to full bloom                          (Chèvrefeuille)

What a joy to make this Tan Renga complete and I wonder .... I wonder ... how you all will make it a complete Tan Renga .... so now it's up to you ... have fun, be inspired and share your completed Tan Renga with our Haiku Kai.
This episode will stay on until November 23th 11.59 AM (CET) and is now open for your submissions.

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Carpe Diem's Tanka Shrine #2, Ishikawa Takuboku's ''on the white sand''


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

A new episode of our Tanka-feature ''Carpe Diem's Tanka Shrine". Several weeks ago I started this new feature and I became really happy to read all your wonderful responses on this Tanka feature. Tanka looks very similar with the Tan Renga, but there's a difference. Tan Renga is a chained poem written by two poets and Tanka is written by one poet. So this 'form' looks familiar I think.
The goal of the Tanka Shrine is to write a new Tanka inspired on the one I gave ... just as we are doing in our Carpe Diem Specials.

For this episode I have chosen a Tanka by Ishikawa Takuboku. Takuboku Ishikawa (1886 –1912) was a Japanese poet. He died of tuberculosis. Well known as both a tanka and "modern-style" (新体詩 shintaishi?) or "free-style" (自由詩 jiyūshi?) poet, he began as a member of the Myōjō group of naturalist poets but later joined the "socialistic" group of Japanese poets and renounced naturalism.(Source: Wikipedia)


Statue of Ishikawa Takuboku at Hakodate, Hokkaido

I love to share this Tanka written by Takuboku for your inspiration:


On the white sand
Of the beach of a small isle
In the Eastern Sea
I, my face streaked with tears,
Am playing with a crab

(c) Ishikawa Takuboku

It's a very sad poem, full of intense emotions, so it will not be an easy task to write a new Tanka in the same tone, sense and spirit as Ishikawa, but ... I have to try:

lost in the woods
desperate and anxious
elderly people
just seeking for a bit of privacy
to live their newly found love

(c) Chèvrefeuille

Hm ... I don't know, this looks more like a Kyoka, but I like this poem a lot. It's full of intense emotions. Yes ... this is a good poem (how immodest). And now it's your turn. Have fun, be inspired and share your Tanka in the same sense, tone and spirit as the one by Ishikawa Takuboku. 
This episode of Carpe Diem's Tanka Shrine will stay on until December 10th 11.59 AM (CET) and is NOW OPEN for your submissions.


Carpe Diem's Tan Renga Challenge Month #XX, WabiSabi's ''old beacon''


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Today I have to share a wonderful haiku as the starting verse of our new Tan Renga Challenge. As read this one I was immediately caught by it, maybe it was the haiga, or maybe just the words, but it caught me ... It's a haiku/haiga written/made by Wabi Sabi of ''Wabi Sabi -- poems and images''. I had to use this one for our Tan Renga Challenge. Here it is, the haiga:

Haiga "Old Beacon'' (c) Wabi Sabi
A wonderful haiga, don''t you think so too? Awesome landscape with a very strong haiku included. This haiku is our starting verse for today's Tan Renga Challenge Month episode and here it is:

old beacon
hailing all strangers -
mind the land

(c) WabiSabi

A great response on our prompt Strangers as provided by Patricia in our first anniversary month, last October. I had to think this one over and over again to compose a second stanza to it, but I think I have succeeded.

Here is my attempt to complete this Tan Renga started by WabiSabi:

old beacon
hailing all strangers -
mind the land                                                   (WabiSabi)

a soothing thought emerges
the lighthouse through the mist                      (Chèvrefeuille)

A nice one I think. Now it's up to you my dear Haijin, visitors and travelers to complete this Tan Renga in your own style ... have fun, be inspired and share.
This episode of our Tan Renga Challenge Month will stay on until November22th 11.59 AM (CET) and is open for your submissions today at 7.00 PM (CET).


Monday, November 18, 2013

Carpe Diem''s Tan Renga Challenge Month #XIX, Carol's ''tickling ivories''


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Today our Tan Renga ''to complete'' is started by Carol of ''a creative harbor'' and it was her response on the prompt ''Ivory'' last month. It's a nice haiku and it caught me as I read it. Up to you is the challenge to complete this Tan Renga by composing the second stanza of Carol's starting verse:

tickling ivories
scintillating music sound
filling the inner soul

(c) Carol

Credits: Windchime

And this is my attempt to complete this Tan Renga with my second stanza:

tickling ivories
scintillating music sound
filling the inner soul                                               (Carol)

walking through the neighborhood
the fragile sound of a windchime                           (Chèvrefeuille)

Ah! That sweet, fragile and soothing sound of a windchime ... the song of angels ...

Now it's up to you to complete this Tan Renga with a second stanza. This episode of our Tan Renga Challenge Month will stay on until November 21th 11.59 AM (CET). Have fun, be inspired and share your completed Tan Renga with our Haiku Kai. !! Submission starts at 7.00 PM (CET) !!



Sunday, November 17, 2013

Carpe Diem's Tan Renga Challenge Month #XVIII, Joanne's "by the shallow pond"


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Another day has gone by and I have to challenge you again with a nice wonderful starting haiku for a Tan Renga ... I love this work of preparing and I really enjoy it. Today I have a nice haiku for starters composed by Joanne of 4Joy. Joanne wrote this haiku in response of our classical kigo Kari (or Goose) last September. As I read this haiku I was in awe ... and responded to Joanne with the question if I might use this masterpiece. I was honored that she gave permission to use it. Here it is ... Joanne's masterpiece on goose:

by the shallow pond
reflection drawing northern fowl
a warm sun shimmers


(c) Joanne



My attempt to complete this Tan Renga started by Joanne:

by the shallow pond
reflection drawing northern fowl
a warm sun shimmers 
                                                              (Joanne)


she looks at herself in the mirror
around her eyes ... a few wrinkles
                                       (Chèvrefeuille)



This episode will stay on until November 20th 11.59 AM (CET) and is now open for your submissions. Have fun, be inspired and share your completed Tan Renga with our haiku-community.
PS. I am hopelessly behind with commenting I hope to catch up ASAP (smiles)



Saturday, November 16, 2013

Carpe Diem Tan Renga Challenge Month #XVII, Jazzbumpa''s " my little green lawn''


Dear Haijin, visitors and travelers,

Today our Tan Renga Challenge is started by Jazzbumpa of Retirement Pastels. Jazzbumpa wrote it in response on our classical kigo 'Susuki, Pampasgrass' in last September. It's a nice haiku and it touched me in someway. Here it is, the haiku which starts our new Tan Renga Challenge:

my little green lawn
dreams about the pampas grass
i dream of the stars

(c) Jazzbumpa


I haven't time enough to respond on this Tan Renga Challenge myself, so it's up to you. I am looking forward to your completions.

This Tan Renga Challenge Month episode will be open for your submissions at 7.00 PM (CET) and will be staying open for submissions until November 19th 11.59 AM (CET).

Have fun, be inspired and share your completed Tan Renga with our Haiku Kai.



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